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View Full Version : New water tank-- now what?



Amelia
01-02-2013, 05:41 PM
There was an excellent article somewhere, I thought here, on inaugurating a new (poly-somethingorother) water tank, but I cannot find it. That job is approaching the top of the list of next things to tackle, and it occurred to me that it would be nice NOT to find out the hard way what we should have done if we had known better. I assume we will want to put it off until spring, but that comes fairly early here. So if anybody has that link, I'd sure appreciate a clue.

OLD HOUSEBOATER
01-03-2013, 01:04 AM
Amelia

I believe Peggie Hall's "Spring Commissioning" procedure is the one your looking for.

Note: My wife and I are sensitive to plastic taste in water. We have a "Pur" filter on our sink faucet and a Whirlpool filter on our fridge Icemaker. They both eleminate the residual plastic taste. Note: You might get more taste from the plumbing you installed than the tank. We have the same plumbing in our house and the taste is objectionable without the filters.

How about some latest of the late pictures?

Tony B
01-03-2013, 06:30 AM
I believe Peggy still has a few copies of her book for sale. It is a great little book and Peggy is a really neat person. Her retirement is our loss. If interested, send me IM and I can get you her e-mail address.
The book title is "Get Rid of Boat Odors". It is mainly about head systems but some info on fresh water winterizing and recommissioning. For those of you that are not familiar with Peggy Hall, her title is "The Head Mistress".

Fork-lift-king
01-03-2013, 06:45 AM
A good place, to check for tanks, is http://www.ronco-plastics.net

Bamby
01-03-2013, 09:48 AM
Amelia

I believe Peggie Hall's "Spring Commissioning" procedure is the one your looking for.

From PEGGIE HALLíS LIBRARY OF CLASSICS (http://trudelutt.com/linker/phall_freshwater.pdf)

Fresh Water Maintenance

Most fresh water system problems - foul odor or taste - donít originate in the tank, but in the plumbing, which is
an ideal environment for molds, fungi and bacteria that thrive in damp dark places. Hereís the recommended
method for recommissioning fresh water systems; this should be done at least annually.

lst Fill the water tank with a solution of 3/4 dl. of household bleach per 10 litre tank capacity.
2nd Turn on every faucet on the boat (including a deck wash if you have one).
3rd Allow the water to run until whatís coming out smells strongly of bleach.
4th Turn off the faucets, but leave system pressurized so the solution remains in the lines.
5th Let stand overnight - at least hours - but NO LONGER THAN 24 HOURS.
6th Drain through every faucet on the boat (and if you havenít done this in a while, itís a good idea to remove any diffusion screens from the faucets, Ďcoz whatís likely to come out will clog them).
7th Fill the tank again with fresh water only
8th Drain again through every faucet on the boat, repeating till the water runs clean and smells and tastes clean.

Remember: cleaning out the tank addresses only the least of the problem ... most of the problem occurs in the lines, so itís very important to leave the system pressurized while the bleach solution is in the tank to keep the solution in the lines too.

People have expressed concern about using this method to recommission aluminum tanks. While bleach (chlorine) IS corrosive, the effect of an annual or semi-annual "shock treatment" is negligible compared to the cumulative effect of holding chlorinated city water in the tank for years. Nevertheless, itís a good idea to mix the total amount of bleach in a few gallons of water before putting it into either a stainless or aluminum tank.

People have also expressed concern about the possible damage by the rubber and neoprene parts in a water pump. Again, the cumulative effect of putting chlorinated water through the pump is more damaging than an occasional "shock treatment". Occasionally, water pumps have been known to fail after recommissioning, but theyíve always been older pumps; recommissioning only "pushed Ďem over the edge" a month or so sooner than theyíd have failed anyway - which I consider preferable to finding yourself without water during the second week of a 3 week cruise.

To keep the water system cleaner longer; USE your fresh water ... keep water flowing through the system. The molds, fungi, and bacteria only start to grow in hoses that arenít being used. Before filling the tank each time, always let the dock water run for at least 15 minutes first ... the same critters that like the lines on your boat LOVE the dock supply line and your hose that sit in the warm sun, and you donít want to transfer water thatís been sitting in the dock supply line to your boatís system. So let the water run long enough to flush out all the water thatís been standing in them so that what goes into your boat is coming straight from the water main.

Bamby
01-03-2013, 09:51 AM
I believe Peggy still has a few copies of her book for sale. It is a great little book and Peggy is a really neat person. Her retirement is our loss. If interested, send me IM and I can get you her e-mail address.
The book title is "Get Rid of Boat Odors". It is mainly about head systems but some info on fresh water winterizing and recommissioning. For those of you that are not familiar with Peggy Hall, her title is "The Head Mistress".

A very good informative book which is actually still available on Amazon (http://www.amazon.com/Get-Rid-Boat-Odors-Aggravation/dp/1892399156)

Actually I miss reading her posts she was so helpful to so many people on many different forums.

Amelia
01-03-2013, 04:58 PM
Thanks! That's just what I was looking for.

easttnboater
01-04-2013, 06:25 AM
Use your tanks all the time and you will not have to do any of that. ie - run water through them and you will be OK.

42gibson
01-04-2013, 06:55 AM
we use "taste pure" in our tanks with every fillup. we never have a smell in our water. you can get it at walmart in the camper dept for around 5 dollars. i myself have never put bleach in my water lines and never will. my brother and his neighbor did and they were weeks getting the stench out of them.when we first got the boat i unhooked all the lines and filled them with a solution of clr and water then flushed them with taste pure. we still had a slight smell in the hot water so i pulled the hot water tank and filled it with a solution of clr and water overnight. then flushed it with fresh water,problem solved.i do use a pur water filter at the sink for drinking water. we hold 200 gl. of fresh water and we use alot with the clothes washer so it keeps the water fresh and moving which i think is the key.....just my 2cents worth

easttnboater
01-04-2013, 09:08 AM
Keeping the water in the tanks fresh - using it - is definitely the key. Peggy's process was for if you had a bad smell/taste due to critters in your water.

If I was starting with a new tank, I would fill it full, let it set for a day, and repeat until the plastic smell/taste was gone enough to suit my preferences.

BananaTom
01-07-2013, 12:03 PM
If I were installing a new tank, I would still follow the bleach thing.

Just because it is new, does not mean it is clean.

Just like new under wear, I wash before I put them on such a vunerabel place.