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Ezgoing
11-29-2014, 10:06 AM
I found this forum when I did a search on how to evaluate older houseboats.

I am interested in acquiring an older houseboat to keep at the slip for occasional overnight use. I have an 18 foot pontoon I use for fishing but it is too small for overnight stays.

I am seeing some of the older houseboats where the engine does not work or in some cases, has been removed.

I wonder how you can price these houseboats when the engine is missing or does not work. I asked about cost to repair on a Gibson and was told that parts were no longer available so repair was not an option.

So can anybody provide any suggestions or guidelines on pricing on older houseboats where the engines are missing or no longer work?

Fork-lift-king
11-29-2014, 11:47 AM
Tell him to give you 5 grand. That is what it will cost him to haul and dispose of it in a landfill.

Ike
11-29-2014, 01:15 PM
Replacing or rebuilding an engine is a major investment. I wouldn't even consider a boat like that. It can only stay tied to the dock, and if you have to (and I do mean have to) move it you'll have to tow it.

OLD HOUSEBOATER
11-29-2014, 02:15 PM
This is a sticky in the forum. This was first written in about 1997 and really needs updating.

http://www.houseboatmagazine.com/forum/showthread.php?21-Inexperenced-Newbies-READ-THIS-WARNING

When you purchase a derelict boat you will be the last owner, Due to current regulations you will be responsible for the disposal of the vessel.

The days of walking away from a boat in the slip or the yard are rapidly coming to a close. Most marinas won't rent a slip to anyone that they suspect will default. On top of this they don't want junk on their docks. The next problem is insurance. No marina will allow a boat that is not insured.To get insurance you have to have a survey. Add this to the cost of purchase.

This is the real world today.

Ezgoing
11-29-2014, 06:40 PM
This is a sticky in the forum. This was first written in about 1997 and really needs updating.

http://www.houseboatmagazine.com/forum/showthread.php?21-Inexperenced-Newbies-READ-THIS-WARNING

When you purchase a derelict boat you will be the last owner, Due to current regulations you will be responsible for the disposal of the vessel.

The days of walking away from a boat in the slip or the yard are rapidly coming to a close. Most marinas won't rent a slip to anyone that they suspect will default. On top of this they don't want junk on their docks. The next problem is insurance. No marina will allow a boat that is not insured.To get insurance you have to have a survey. Add this to the cost of purchase.

This is the real world today.

Thanks for the advice and the pointer to that thread. It was interesting reading.

I can see that are more aspects to this than I had considered. I was just looking for a houseboat to keep at the slip to use on the nights I did not want to return home. I did not plan on taking the houseboat out of the slip so my concern was how much less it should cost without a working engine.

Now that I've read that thread I realize that the engine not working might be a sign of other, hidden problems.

Thanks to you I now know to have the boat checked out thoroughly by an expert before I buy it.

stp012
11-30-2014, 05:12 AM
Anyone know what it costs to dispose of a derelict fiberglass houseboat? It can't be cheap. I would have to guess $5k to $10k by the time you figure freight and rigging.

Just curious...

Tony B
11-30-2014, 06:20 AM
...................
When you purchase a derelict boat you will be the last owner, Due to current regulations you will be responsible for the disposal of the vessel. .............. Add this to the cost of purchase.

This has to be included in "Famous Quotes"
Truer words were never spoken.

BananaTom
12-01-2014, 07:56 AM
I am interested in acquiring an older houseboat to keep at the slip for occasional overnight use.

I see you are in Dallas, would this be placed in a Land Locked Lake?

BananaTom
12-01-2014, 08:04 AM
I am seeing some of the older houseboats where the engine does not work or in some cases, has been removed.

I wonder how you can price these houseboats when the engine is missing or does not work. I asked about cost to repair on a Gibson and was told that parts were no longer available so repair was not an option.

So can anybody provide any suggestions or guidelines on pricing on older houseboats where the engines are missing or no longer work?

To re-power a houseboat, lets say a Gibson 350 Crusader, plane on spending about $5,000 to $7,000 per engine. Single or double screw.
Then if you are on a land lock lake, you got some high costs of transportation.

To provide more information on what you are asking, more details are needed.

What boat? What year? What size?
A 14 foot beam is more desirable than a 12 foot beam.

However, lets talk about a 36 foot Gibson, Dual Helm, no engines, 1989.
These are valued in good condition with motors between $25,000 and $35,000.
Determine the cost to repair, lets say $14,000 to re-power twin engines.
You will have another $5000 of incidentals, generator, cooling pumps, tranmissions.

The boat value to me would $2,000 to $5,000

SinOrSwim
12-01-2014, 02:41 PM
find an old pontoon houseboat with aluminum pontoons. Many of them can be had pretty cheap and the maintenance is WAY less than a hull. Everything is easy to get at when trying to fix or upgrade. Outboard, if needed, can be had pretty cheap too. Overall, way less cost.

Ezgoing
12-01-2014, 05:52 PM
To re-power a houseboat, lets say a Gibson 350 Crusader, plane on spending about $5,000 to $7,000 per engine. Single or double screw.
Then if you are on a land lock lake, you got some high costs of transportation.

To provide more information on what you are asking, more details are needed.

What boat? What year? What size?
A 14 foot beam is more desirable than a 12 foot beam.

However, lets talk about a 36 foot Gibson, Dual Helm, no engines, 1989.
These are valued in good condition with motors between $25,000 and $35,000.
Determine the cost to repair, lets say $14,000 to re-power twin engines.
You will have another $5000 of incidentals, generator, cooling pumps, tranmissions.

The boat value to me would $2,000 to $5,000

Thanks for your response.

Yes, the lakes around here are landlocked. :) One of the boats I looked at was a 1984 12 x36 Gibson with twin engines, both removed from boat. There is a trailer available with the boat but would need new tires. Another was a 79 model, another was a 73 model. These had non-working engines but no trailers.

I have seen these boats listed for $14,500 (with make offer listing) with working engines and recent updates to equipment. The ones I saw without engines wanted around $10,000 for them, as is.

So I will not be buying one without everything working nor will I be buying one before having it surveyed. I'm glad I found this forum before I went any further. :)

easttnboater
12-02-2014, 05:22 AM
You can pretty much bet that the stringers and/or transom of all of the boats you have listed are rotten and will need to be replaced. Aluminum hulled is your best bet. Houseboating is not cheap. It does not have to cost hundreds of thousands of dollars, but you get what you pay for.

Tony B
12-04-2014, 08:26 AM
To re-power a houseboat, lets say a Gibson 350 Crusader, plane on spending about $5,000 to $7,000 per engine. ..........

Is this the cost of the engine alone or is this a typical engine including installation cost?
Thanks in advance.

BananaTom
12-04-2014, 08:55 AM
Is this the cost of the engine alone or is this a typical engine including installation cost?
Thanks in advance.

Total cost, with labor.

I had a mechanic quote $4,000 per engine for new Crusader 350's in the box.
However, I know there is always other costs that will pop up, so I ad $1000.

That is why $5k to $7k will get it done.
As transmission problems maybe discovered as well during a re-power of a non-running vessel.

Tony B
12-05-2014, 05:11 AM
Thanks Tom

That's a lot less than I expected. I think if I had to repower both Crusader 350's, I might seriously think about two small diesels about 80 HP each since I don't run fast anyway. I wonder what that would cost. Could turn out to be a major undertaking. Just thinking. After all, I am on 'final' boat #3. My Catalina 30 sailboat was definitely my last boat - until hurricane Katrina. Then I bought an Allied 39 sailboat. Oh yeah, this was definitely going to be my last boat - until the admiral developed a degenerative lung disorder and thyroid problems. She no longer wanted to go sailing. So, here we are with our Mainship 36. Have it a little over a year now (I think) and it is still our perfect boat. I guess this is our final boat #3.

easttnboater
12-05-2014, 05:49 AM
Repowering with diesels will be probably 4 x. You have to swap out most of the ancillary systems. Also, unless this is truly your final boat and you just want diesel propulsion, you will never get the money back.

Tony B
12-05-2014, 08:30 AM
Thanks. That what I thought.

Endurance
12-05-2014, 08:42 AM
After all, I am on 'final' boat #3.

Pretty funny and all too true. :cool: It reminds me of a boat I saw in California named "Never Again 6"