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JTAlberts
05-23-2013, 01:22 PM
We experienced an issue last year when our battery bank died and we had to run off our generator for a night to charge the batteries. The generator ran fine, smells a little rich, but the exhaust kept filtering into the cabin and setting off our CO2 alarm. It is a wet exhaust, but there is still a decent amount of fumes that come with it and into the air.

Does anyone have any tips for controlling it? I would also like to not offend other boaters with it if possible.

easttnboater
05-23-2013, 01:50 PM
Depends on how fancy you want to get. Where on your boat does the exhaust come out? How far above the waterline?

Stmbtwle
05-23-2013, 02:02 PM
It's more than a matter of offending your neighbors, that exhaust can KILL you and your family.

It's been a problem for many houseboats. The answer seems to be a water-separator in the exhaust line, then run the exhaust stack several feet above the roof of the boat. That tall skinny pipe in the picture is the generator exhaust. Google it.

http://s71.photobucket.com/user/stmbtwle/media/houseboatstack.jpg.html?sort=3&o=38

GoVols
05-23-2013, 02:10 PM
A friend's Sharpe has a special PVC type system that extends far back in the water behind the boat to vent the exhaust. I believe his boat came with it, but I'm sure you could google it and find something.

I know Sumerset houseboats had a giant recall because theirs exhausted behind the boat, which swept back into the boat and could kill you. All boats should vent the gen exhaust from the side, if not the deal that Stmbtwle showed.

JTAlberts
05-23-2013, 06:32 PM
It vents straight out the back and about 12 inches above the waterline. When we use the genset, it is a rare occasion. I will have to look into the exhaust water separator and possible make some temporary for those times.

Stmbtwle
05-24-2013, 05:05 AM
I'd like to figure out a similar system for my main engine. It's a diesel so the CO isn't as much of a problem, but the smell is, and sometimes the wind or the "station wagon effect" brings it into the boat.

easttnboater
05-24-2013, 06:33 AM
Sumerset's "recall" was because the exhaust out the back would get caught under the swim platform and people swimming behind the boat or under the platform would get into the CO. There were some drownings attributed to it. I am pretty sure that Sumerset did the recall on their own - it was not mandated.

You can dry stack it like Willie said, but that will entail quite a bit of engineering. You can plumb it down under the water which will diffuse it some. Or, you can use some floating flex hose and get it out away from your boat.

JTAlberts
05-24-2013, 07:35 AM
Sumerset's "recall" was because the exhaust out the back would get caught under the swim platform and people swimming behind the boat or under the platform would get into the CO. There were some drownings attributed to it. I am pretty sure that Sumerset did the recall on their own - it was not mandated.

You can dry stack it like Willie said, but that will entail quite a bit of engineering. You can plumb it down under the water which will diffuse it some. Or, you can use some floating flex hose and get it out away from your boat.

Are there any issues with back pressure if plumbed below the water? A banana in a tail pipe always comes to mind when thinking about it.

easttnboater
05-24-2013, 07:57 AM
We always used a potato. I have seen them plumbed down just right below the waterline - maybe an inch or two. Mine exits maybe an inch above the waterline. I would like to get it right below the waterline to dampen down the splashing, but the bubbling might be worse.

Stmbtwle
05-24-2013, 09:13 AM
That's why I like my solar; quiet, and no CO. I just wish they'd run the AC...

JTAlberts
05-24-2013, 11:51 AM
That's why I like my solar; quiet, and no CO. I just wish they'd run the AC...

The AC and Microwave are the two things that I use it for. I would just do away with the Genset if it wasn't for those two things.

Frantically Relaxing
05-24-2013, 12:57 PM
I have no evidence to support this, but it's my opinion that if the smell of a fart under water will come up with the bubbles, so will the CO gas in exhaust. And it doesn't matter where else the exhausts exits, if there's no wind to blow the CO away, it can find its way into your boat. Our Party Cruiser has a dry side-exhausted Onan genny, our SkipperLiner has an under-deck wet exhaust. Both have succeeded in setting of CO alarms on calm days. And fwiw, our under-deck exhaust was tested and found to be no more less dangerous than any other type of exhaust. Several times while on the hook we've had the genny running the entire day to keep the AC and fridges running, with no signs of CO at all. BUT, there's always at least a slight breeze, and that seems to be all that's needed to disperse the C0.

You simply have to be extremely careful running the generator. If it's setting off C0 alarms, you shouldn't be running it...

OLD HOUSEBOATER
05-24-2013, 01:38 PM
Many boaters bring exhaut problems on them selves. In the south many boaters run ther Gennys 100% including me. When we anchor out we DON'T EVER use a stern anchor. Usually there is a breeze and allowing the boat to swing with the wind causes the fumes to blow away from the boat. If we leave the back doors open (not very often due to the air conditioning) we leave the front open to allow air flow thru the cabin.

If we beach we don't run the Genny unless the wind is offshore. We almost NEVER beach cause bottom jobs are so EXPENSIVE.

42gibson
05-25-2013, 07:35 AM
i start my generator before i start my main engines. when we anchor out i do turn it off for a while now and then but in mostly stays on. i have been thinking about a 1000cc honda gen for the fridge only since i dont have an inverter and dont plan on putting one in.

Stmbtwle
05-25-2013, 08:34 AM
I know some houseboaters do that, to save gas vs running the main genset. I have a 1000... which is one of the reasons I went to solar. Listening to that thing surge every time the fridge or the battery charger kicked in was a real distraction.

OLD HOUSEBOATER
05-25-2013, 04:43 PM
Reality Check: In the south many of us run our Genny's 100%. For the most part we don't end up dead or even sick. We don't swim under solid swim platforms. Most of us pay attention to which way the breeze is blowing and keep the back shut when underway. Alternativly we crack a window in front if the back door is open. Many of us run the air conditioner at night, we keep the back door closed and anchor with a lot of scope so the boat can swing with the breeze. We keep the battries up in both CO detectors and test them once in awhile. We even inspect the exhaust system on our Genneys. (How about that) S**t can happen but most of the time, if common sense is used, we don't make the evening news.