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Thread: New Houseboat being home built

  1. #11
    Senior Member Amelia's Avatar
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    Maybe he only plans to travel on calm days? Maybe he has an ideal bit of waterfront, and will moor it for a perfect little lake house? It doesn't take much horsepower to move a boat so long as you're not in a hurry, into the wind or current, or in a tight spot with a crosswind, right?

  2. #12
    No that is the thing. He is designing this to get 4-5 mpg, handle easily, be able to do a good part of the Great Loop, run the bow aground and unload his car. In other words to do a lot of traveling.

  3. #13
    Senior Member easttnboater's Avatar
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    Then, to be brutally honest, he is living in a fantasy world. If he tries to run that boat up river against any kind of current, he will end up going backwards. He needs to buy a physics for dummies book and get acquainted with it.

  4. #14
    Senior Member GoVols's Avatar
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    Desimulacra, PROMISE US that you you'll be there with video camera in-hand when he tries to load his vehicle in it. The results of that effort would surely go viral on youtube! LOL!
    '06 Sailabration located on Percy Priest Lake

    Bet On Another Thousand

  5. #15
    Senior Member Stmbtwle's Avatar
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    Then again, one could always put someone in the dinghy/jetski/fishing boat and tell them to make like a tugboat.
    She's a tired old barge but she's paid for... http://s71.beta.photobucket.com/user...24993.pbw.html

  6. #16
    I was really sick this weekend but did run by the boat and while there looked across the bay. He has the walls complete and painted, she is looking close to done on the outside. I really admire this guy for his ability to do something like this but one of my favorite expressions is " Don't reinvent the wheel"
    Which simple means that a subject that is thoroughly thought out and works really well, just copy it or at the least thoroughly study it so you can understand if your ideas are an improvement and the whole world missed the greatest thing ever,,, sarcasm mostly.
    If on no other point I promise you I know I or any other reasoning person don't want to be out on the waterways with only one means of propulsion, if further than a short tow to my own dock!!!
    Last edited by desimulacra; 05-20-2014 at 10:43 AM.

  7. #17
    Senior Member Amelia's Avatar
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    The trouble with going with what Everybody Else has done is that not everybody wants to be Everybody Else. Production boats are, necessarily, compromises. Not all of us want the steering tucked in a corner as an afterthought, or six tiny dark staterooms, or the galley up front and only access to the rear deck through the master stateroom. Not all of us want formal decor, mirrored walls, fake fireplaces, and quarter-inch fake woodgrain paneling. Some people want to go sit on their boat at the dock on the lake this very weekend, and I sympathize. These ideas are fine, and most people clearly want their houseboat to look as flashy as everybody else's, and are willing and able to pay several hundred thousand dollars to have all those things in a tasteful shade of beige. Most people wouldn't think of building their own house or their own airplane, for that matter, but for others, the joy is in the challenge, the project. We are among those crazy people who have looked, considered, and made alternative decisions. We wanted something other than a cookie-cutter boat, we wanted a project, and we weren't willing to mortgage the grandchildren. We have made mistakes, certainly. We have a short, but growing list of things we think we ought to have done differently. But all in all, we are very pleased with our backwards layout, the sturdiness, handling and comfort of the craft, and it's a hoot to see people shake their heads wonderingly. Whod'a thunk it? The thing floats, it's maneuverable enough, it handles 3-4 foot seas adequately... And it didn't cost us a hundred grand. Yet. I hope disimulacra's neighbor turns out to be as pleased. If he isn't, maybe he can hang a second outboard on?

  8. #18
    To me that is his biggest mistake and Amelia as thoughtful as the rest of the design is I bet he has already thought of that. My single engine has left me high and dry one time, 2 miles from home and a run about pulled me in. I have also been on boats with two engines that came in on one. I like two for the backup and for traveling I think 2 engines are necessary for safety.

  9. #19
    Senior Member Amelia's Avatar
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    I agree! We found ourselves with a broken fuel line in the port outboard last summer, and no idea what the problem was until we limped back to our dock on one motor. Docking it with power only on the starboard side was a bit of a circus. We ended up going in nose first and hauling alongside with a springline. Not very graceful, but it worked. Two engines are definitely better! But definitely twice as expensive, alas.

  10. #20
    Senior Member easttnboater's Avatar
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    I admire anyone that wants to spend the time and effort to build a boat basically from scratch. I have rebuilt three production boats so far - that is my preference, my challenge.

    But, this guy is way, way out in the weeds. I owned a 14 x 72 foot Jamestowner powered by a single 150 hp outboard for ten years. I took it out of the slip most weekends from the beginning of May until the end of September each year. It was an absolute beast to control. I got very good at it, but the basic design had limitations. The owner for the last three years has taken it out maybe five times and has run over everything close to his slip on the way back in. I know what I am talking about here.

    This boat is not in any way form or fashion suited to his stated goals. It is severely underpowered and will have very limited maneuverability. He could add another outboard, but he will still be limited by the small prop size available on outboards. He is working against the basic laws of physics.

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