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Thread: My houseboat

  1. #21
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2014
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    16
    Sorry, my internet was down for last 2 days. The houseboat was not free, but close. Yes, over 30 years old and so my power "production" boat. In my power boat, the wood still in good shape. You all right - you get what you paid for, but his boat was expensive at some point while my power boat was priced less. My point is that no one in "decent state of mind" would use particle board on a boat - that just plain stupid. The second: the sleeping area - two full size beds - were design by some idiot with disregard to safety - only one narrow exit. After over 30 years, the boat still floats and that is a plus. It is in marina on mooring ball and "take on" very little of a water - less that a gallon a week ( not include a rain). The hull is still strong and deck have no soft spots. As I said before, the "bones" are good and worth restoration. This will be my third "project" boat.

  2. #22
    Your 28' Carver was a lot less boat than the Holiday. In general, the fit and finish in a houseboat isn't quite as nice as it is in an ocean boat but it's also less expensive. I think if you compare the Holiday to an ocean boat with the same size and living space you'll find the ocean boat to be a lot more expensive. Comparing it to a 28' Carver is apples to oranges. FWIW, I owned a Carver 28'.

    Also, you will get far more constructive feedback on here with a more positive approach. Coming on here only to post how much you hate the boat, and how stupid you feel the designers were isn't going to get you a whole lot of love. There are a lot of Holidays out there still on the water. I have one. Sure, there are some cheesy things about the interior design but if you do some research on houseboats you may find that their overall design is believed to be pretty good.

    That said, I recommend you check the engine room stringers as they have a tendency to rot even in a dry bilge. Don't ask me how I know....
    Last edited by stp012; 11-25-2014 at 07:53 PM.

  3. #23
    Junior Member
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    Nov 2014
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    "Coming on here only to post how much you hate the boat" - I do not hate the boat. If I do, I would junk it. In any given house - you have a door and window. In case of fire ( or rapid water intrusion), you have 2 ways to escape. I would like to see someone escaping trough those portholes. That design is real safety issue - show stupidity and disregard to human life by designer. I am planing to correct that. Houseboat,sailboat, powerboat - all have one thing in coming - they floats. Moisture on outside and inside. Those, who live in Florida, have good idea of what I am talking about. I took the engine out of my Carver - talking about stringers rot. Had to replace the wood in it. I did a lot of fiberglass work on my Carver, and to tell you the truth, I would be scare to take this boat off shore. I do have a positive approach - I am planning to restore this boat. Wood can be replace, but human life can not be replaced. Just pointing out some design flaws.

  4. #24
    Ok, appears you know all you need to know. Best of luck with your project.

  5. #25
    Junior Member
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    Nov 2014
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    16
    I am still learning. When I started with Watkins 27 sailboat, I knew nothing about a boats. I learned the "glass work", interior design. Who`s idea was to name a toilet as "head". I would like to believe that I do not have a sh.. for brain. After 4 years, I am still getting confuse about the "starboard" and "portside". My recent trip from St.Marys,GA to Green Cove Spring,Fl, on my Hunter 33 almost end up in disaster. Forgot about the tide change, when I drop an anchor. I drop it at high tide. You can imagine the rest - laying on the portside with rails touching the water. 5 hours of horror, but the tide come back and lift the boat. Float away. I wish that I know all what I need to know, but honestly, I do not know that much - not even close. Still learning.

  6. #26
    Member
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    Jul 2012
    Location
    Pacific Northwest
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    I do agree with dupek that particle board should not be used in boats but let me give a little insight into the houseboat biz. Back when I was still working in the Coast Guard Office Of Boating Safety we got involved with the houseboat industry in the early 90's because of some electrical problems that were injuring and in some case killing people. We really hadn't paid much attention to the Houseboat world until then simply because of lack of resources (people) and the industry was still small (about a dozen builders). As we began to visit builders though we found lots of problems. A lot of the people building these boats had come over form the RV industry and didn't have a clue about standards for boats. Some of the old timers like Sumerset and Jamestowner did but many newcomers were just building and selling and not paying much heed to what they were tuning out. Well, in addition to sending our own inspectors out there, we sicced ABYC and NMMA on them and within a few years most were building to boat standards, so by the late 90's things had improved a lot. But there are some things these standards do not cover. One of them is interior structure unless you are building to LLoyds, ABS, or USCG standards for commercial boats. And the superstructure on house boats are built much like houses. Stud walls, wood paneling and so one. In over about 15 years I visited almost all the houseboat builders. By then there were about 19 builders. It's a niche industry. Some were good, some were bad and a few, as was said, I wouldn't let build dog houses.

    However this is unfortunately true of the boat manufacturing industry as a whole. I have been to hundreds of boat manufacturers. You can usually tell the minute you walk in the door what the quality of the boats is. Fortunately the bad apples usually don't last long because this is a real cutthroat industry and shoddy boats don't last long, and most consumers get fooled only once. But as mountaineer said upkeep is the real secret. Boats. no matter how "maintenance free" have to be taken care of. If you don't it won't take care of you! The industry has done it to itself by advertising their boats a maintenance free, which is not true, but newcomers buy in to it. Too bad.

    Amelai, sorry that your other half doesn't take well to water. I have the same problem. My wife won't go out in the boat if there is much more than ripple on the water. She's gotten better since I bought an 18 foot Sea Ray (which was a derelict and I completely restored it) but can't get her out on the "big water" except on something the size of a large ferry boat or bigger. Just grin and bear it.
    Last edited by Ike; 11-28-2014 at 05:22 PM.

  7. #27
    Member
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    Jul 2012
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    Pacific Northwest
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    Oh and by the way this happens in all parts of the industry. I remember a fellow who bought a Marine Trader (a trawler yacht). His complaint was that the boat was simply not put together well. He was constantly having to take things apart and put them back together, after which they worked really well. He said "if I had wanted a kit I would have bought one!" Unfortunately this is true of a lot of boats.

  8. #28
    Senior Member Tony B's Avatar
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    Jul 2012
    Location
    Little Tennessee River (Tellico Lak) near Knoxville
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    You guys on houseboats are spoiled. When it comes to repairs, everything has a whole lot easier access than on a sailboat or a trawler. I have a 36' trawler style boat and am in the process of replacing my forward head and adding a PuraSan Waste Treatnment System. It took me almost 2 weeks to finally decide where and how I can shoe horn this stuff in and still have almost reasonable access for repairs and normal servicing. The other day it took almost the entire day to run 2 pairs of wires. - battery leads from the electric toilet and waste treatment system to my house battery bank. And even this was a lot easier than on my sailboats.
    I cant understand how the original poster could complain about refurbishing a houseboat after he has previously done work on a 27 foot sailboat. If you have to replace the cabinets, just do it. On a sailboat, most cabinets wont even fit through the companionway (doorway). They have to be prefabed and assembled in inside the boat. To understand this, you have to know how sailboats are built. The fiberglass hull is made first. Then everything including the engine, wiring, plumbing, etc is put in place. Then the lining if set on top of this. The lining usually includes the finished floor and built-in seating etc. Then the cabinets are added. After that, the upper part of the boat is set in place. The upper part is the roof and decking. Now everything is sealed in. Absolutely no thought given to maintenance. The only consideration is in ease of manufacture - I might be wrong here, but it sure appears that way.
    And Dupek is complaining about working on a houseboat.
    Houseboater at Heart
    1986 Mainship 36 Dual Cabin Pointed Ended House Boat

  9. #29
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2014
    Posts
    16
    Just finish the Carver, drop on water and will try to sell it or give away, then I will start working on my houseboat. You are right - working on houseboat will be a lot easy that a sailboat. A lot of room - big sliding door on back. It is just a wood, but I got small problem working with a wood. I measure 5 times the wood that I need to cut for outboard bracket and still come out crooked. About the 27 sailboat - I had to replace the compression post. 6 feet long 4X4. It took me a while to get it inside. Removing the old one and putting new one in place - that another story. I am not complaining about working on my houseboat - just pointing some design "mess". At least, I do not have long metal stick that attract a lighting.

  10. #30
    Senior Member Frantically Relaxing's Avatar
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    Jul 2012
    Location
    Salt Lake
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    118
    This thread is pretty amusing to me. I've carefully read every post by dupek in this thread. No where can I find a complaint from him about working on, or needing to work on, this houseboat, or any other boat. His complaints are of the flaws, in his opinion, of various designs, engineering and construction of the boats he's familiar with. And of his own woodworking skills. And he freely admits he's not all that knowledgeable about boats. Just my opinion, but his honesty is refreshing, and he seems to be enjoying the work!
    1988 SkipperLiner 53x14
    1995 Tracker Party Cruiser 32
    2002 Regal 2860 Commodore
    1987 Sea Ray 21' Seville midcabin
    2000 Allegro Bus 40' DP

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