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Thread: Person capacity

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  1. #1
    Junior Member 50-Desoto's Avatar
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    Person capacity

    I have a 1986 44 foot Gibson Standard houseboat, It doesn't have a capacity placard, I need to know how many people can be on the boat?

  2. #2
    Senior Member easttnboater's Avatar
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    Houseboats do not have capacity limits. In my opinion, you should never have more people on your boat than you can keep track of. Most people that visit me are lake novices. They have no idea the dangers on a boat and on the water. Make sure you give them the safety talk and make sure they wear flotation - at least while underway or in the water. If you are only concerned about the effect on the trim of the boat, then it is much more about weight and distribution than it is about number of people.

  3. #3
    Junior Member 50-Desoto's Avatar
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    Thank for the info easttnboater.

  4. #4
    Senior Member BananaTom's Avatar
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    I kept 30 life jackets on my 36' Gibson, and would put that many people on board for events Like 4th of July Fireworks.

  5. #5
    Senior Member 42gibson's Avatar
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    I never let more on than I can comfortably seat.
    44 gibson executive
    on the muskingum river & ohio river
    marietta,ohio

  6. #6
    Senior Member Stmbtwle's Avatar
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    I agree with Easttnboater and 42gibson. PROPERLY DISTRIBUTED, houseboats can handle a lot more weight than is safe to carry. However people move around; should 20 or so decide to go up on the roof or onto the bow for a better view, handling and/or stability can be compromised. Then there's the problem of keeping track of everyone, particularly children. Maybe I just don't like crowds; if I wanted to run a tour boat I'd have a tour boat and charge admission.
    She's a tired old barge but she's paid for!

  7. #7
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    It will "PARTY" fifty but, it only sleeps TWO.

  8. #8
    Senior Member Amelia's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Fork-lift-king View Post
    It will "PARTY" fifty but, it only sleeps TWO.
    LOL. Same with the Lotus Eater. We had the entire yacht club membership aboard for dinner. We, and the mobility-impaired, motored to a calm spot overlooking the water lilies in our scenic creek, and anchored. Folding tables and chairs had been transferred topside, along with lots of people, pizza, and refreshment. Racing yachts tied up alongside, and the after-race party commenced. All were instructed to bring their own PFDs. Worked great, until somebody on the top deck looked over the stern and, said, "hey, y'all, check this out."
    There was a minor stampede sternward, which created some weight and balance problems, flooding the outboard engine wells. Oops. Fortunately, we had a good sump pump and portable generator aboard, problem soon solved. Ever since, members have wondered when the club will do another raft-up with that wonderful houseboat. The skipper ain't sayin.

  9. #9
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    I would suggest you ask Gibson what they consider a safe number of passengers. http://www.gibsonboats.com/default.htm. As has been mentioned above weight distribution is all important. Too many people on the fly bridge will have a much greater affect on stability than the same number on a lower deck. ABYC (abyicinc.org) now requires a label on the flybridge that specifies how many people can safely be on the flybridge. The important issue here is stability. A surveyor or a naval architect could do an inclining experiment and tell you exactly how many you can carry but it wouldn't be cheap. That's what the USCG does on small passenger (for hire) vessels to determine how many passengers they can carry.

  10. #10
    Senior Member 42gibson's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ike View Post
    I would suggest you ask Gibson what they consider a safe number of passengers. http://www.gibsonboats.com/default.htm. As has been mentioned above weight distribution is all important. Too many people on the fly bridge will have a much greater affect on stability than the same number on a lower deck. ABYC (abyicinc.org) now requires a label on the flybridge that specifies how many people can safely be on the flybridge. The important issue here is stability. A surveyor or a naval architect could do an inclining experiment and tell you exactly how many you can carry but it wouldn't be cheap. That's what the USCG does on small passenger (for hire) vessels to determine how many passengers they can carry.
    when did Gibson reopen ?
    44 gibson executive
    on the muskingum river & ohio river
    marietta,ohio

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