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Thread: Generator Exhaust

  1. #1
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    Generator Exhaust

    We experienced an issue last year when our battery bank died and we had to run off our generator for a night to charge the batteries. The generator ran fine, smells a little rich, but the exhaust kept filtering into the cabin and setting off our CO2 alarm. It is a wet exhaust, but there is still a decent amount of fumes that come with it and into the air.

    Does anyone have any tips for controlling it? I would also like to not offend other boaters with it if possible.

  2. #2
    Senior Member easttnboater's Avatar
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    Depends on how fancy you want to get. Where on your boat does the exhaust come out? How far above the waterline?

  3. #3
    Senior Member Stmbtwle's Avatar
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    It's more than a matter of offending your neighbors, that exhaust can KILL you and your family.

    It's been a problem for many houseboats. The answer seems to be a water-separator in the exhaust line, then run the exhaust stack several feet above the roof of the boat. That tall skinny pipe in the picture is the generator exhaust. Google it.

    http://s71.photobucket.com/user/stmb...ml?sort=3&o=38
    Last edited by Stmbtwle; 05-23-2013 at 02:09 PM.
    She's a tired old barge but she's paid for... http://s71.beta.photobucket.com/user...24993.pbw.html

  4. #4
    Senior Member GoVols's Avatar
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    A friend's Sharpe has a special PVC type system that extends far back in the water behind the boat to vent the exhaust. I believe his boat came with it, but I'm sure you could google it and find something.

    I know Sumerset houseboats had a giant recall because theirs exhausted behind the boat, which swept back into the boat and could kill you. All boats should vent the gen exhaust from the side, if not the deal that Stmbtwle showed.
    '06 Sailabration located on Percy Priest Lake

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  5. #5
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    It vents straight out the back and about 12 inches above the waterline. When we use the genset, it is a rare occasion. I will have to look into the exhaust water separator and possible make some temporary for those times.

  6. #6
    Senior Member Stmbtwle's Avatar
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    I'd like to figure out a similar system for my main engine. It's a diesel so the CO isn't as much of a problem, but the smell is, and sometimes the wind or the "station wagon effect" brings it into the boat.
    She's a tired old barge but she's paid for... http://s71.beta.photobucket.com/user...24993.pbw.html

  7. #7
    Senior Member easttnboater's Avatar
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    Sumerset's "recall" was because the exhaust out the back would get caught under the swim platform and people swimming behind the boat or under the platform would get into the CO. There were some drownings attributed to it. I am pretty sure that Sumerset did the recall on their own - it was not mandated.

    You can dry stack it like Willie said, but that will entail quite a bit of engineering. You can plumb it down under the water which will diffuse it some. Or, you can use some floating flex hose and get it out away from your boat.

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by easttnboater View Post
    Sumerset's "recall" was because the exhaust out the back would get caught under the swim platform and people swimming behind the boat or under the platform would get into the CO. There were some drownings attributed to it. I am pretty sure that Sumerset did the recall on their own - it was not mandated.

    You can dry stack it like Willie said, but that will entail quite a bit of engineering. You can plumb it down under the water which will diffuse it some. Or, you can use some floating flex hose and get it out away from your boat.
    Are there any issues with back pressure if plumbed below the water? A banana in a tail pipe always comes to mind when thinking about it.

  9. #9
    Senior Member easttnboater's Avatar
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    We always used a potato. I have seen them plumbed down just right below the waterline - maybe an inch or two. Mine exits maybe an inch above the waterline. I would like to get it right below the waterline to dampen down the splashing, but the bubbling might be worse.

  10. #10
    Senior Member Stmbtwle's Avatar
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    That's why I like my solar; quiet, and no CO. I just wish they'd run the AC...
    She's a tired old barge but she's paid for... http://s71.beta.photobucket.com/user...24993.pbw.html

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