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Thread: anchor rope question

  1. #11
    Senior Member Stmbtwle's Avatar
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    Apr 2003
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    Ruskin, Florida
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    2,348
    I use a bridle made fast to the two corner cleats. It cuts the swinging down about 75%.
    She's a tired old barge but she's paid for... http://s71.beta.photobucket.com/user...24993.pbw.html

  2. #12
    Junior Member SinOrSwim's Avatar
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    Jul 2012
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    Ok, both interesting thoughts. Tie to cleat but have it run to the center first. Just need to figure out what it goes around so it doesn't wear the rope out? Or, I see what you mean with the bridle. Like a big V but again, how to control how much line is out? I don't anchor often but our lake does not have many large enough coves to get completely out of thte wind. Our lake and marina in general are very windy. So, that is why I swing wildly. We had one day people were swimming off the back and all of a sudden would be 60 to 100 feet away from teh boat because it swung the opposite direction.

    Even our marina. Has a wave wall at the entrance but the other night (july 5th) I was coming in and had to dock that thing in about 12 to 15mph crosswinds. At night! Ugh!!!! It's not a huge boat at 58 feet but my slip is only about 17 or 18 wide and the boat is 15. Not a lot of room for error.

    I will tinker with some things. I bought some chain and some other fastners the other day at the farm supply store.

  3. #13
    Senior Member Stmbtwle's Avatar
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    Apr 2003
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    Ruskin, Florida
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    My bridle is two pieces of line about 30' long spliced together with about a 2' "tag line" at the connection. Each of the long legs has a small eye splice that just goes on a corner cleat. I leave it rigged to the cleats all the time, and stow it coiled on deck. When anchoring I set the anchor and pay out the rode to about 30' less than I need, then make the "tag" fast to the rode with a rolling hitch. Then pay out more rode till the bridle takes the load, and secure the rode with a little slack. I can put out as much or as little rode as I like, but once the bridle is set I can't pay out any more without first heaving up to the hitch and releasing it.

    If the hitch slips (it won't if done right), the rode is there, made fast, to take the strain.

    Weighing anchor, I simply heave up till I get to the hitch and release it, then heave up the rest of the rode in the usual way.

    I use my anchor a LOT, sometimes even when docking or turning the boat in my narrow canal. It has saved my skin more than once. It has to be ready to go and one needs to plan ahead, but it works. Needless to say I don't use the bridle in those instances.
    Last edited by Stmbtwle; 07-10-2013 at 10:28 AM.
    She's a tired old barge but she's paid for... http://s71.beta.photobucket.com/user...24993.pbw.html

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