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Thread: Kitchen Range/Oven Recommendation Needed

  1. #11
    Super Moderator OLD HOUSEBOATER's Avatar
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    Electric is fine if you have a 220volt generator. However: Gas is tons better on a boat. A lot of people convert their boat to gas. Your the first person that I have heard of going electric from gas. (over 60 years of boating)
    The fries are cold so we gave you extra.

  2. #12
    Senior Member easttnboater's Avatar
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    OK. You want electric and have heard from the folks telling you why they think it is a bad idea. But, it is your boat and your choice, so a little more information is needed before a detailed answer can be given.

    1. What type of shore power do you have? 110v 30 amp, 220v 50 amp, dual 220v 50 amp, ... ?
    2. What type of power distribution setup do you have? Traditional home style breaker box, custom Jamestowner setup, ...?
    3. What type is the propane unit? Standalone, drop in, ...? What size is it?
    4. What size generator?
    5. Are you going to do this yourself or hire it out?

    Pics would help.

  3. #13
    Senior Member Stmbtwle's Avatar
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    Yep. If the generator and wiring aren't already up to the task, it's going to cost a lot more than the stove.
    She's a tired old barge but she's paid for... http://s71.beta.photobucket.com/user...24993.pbw.html

  4. #14
    Super Moderator OLD HOUSEBOATER's Avatar
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    If you are limited to 110 volts your heating power is limited. Like trying to cook with 2 candles.

    If you have a 10KW 220 volt Genny go for it.
    Last edited by OLD HOUSEBOATER; 09-14-2013 at 08:36 AM.
    The fries are cold so we gave you extra.

  5. #15
    Member Frantically Relaxing's Avatar
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    From one who likes to cook

    Since your wife likes to cook, you'll be needing 4 burners. If you don't have 220v service, you're about doomed to geting gas. Many people don't realize (I didn't until recently) that 220 volts results in FOUR times the heating power of a heating element while using only TWO times the amperage. This means if a typical 220v stove uses 50 amps, a 110v version will require 200 amps to create the same amount of cooking heat--

    I've recently bought stoves-- a gas stove for our mobile home, and a ceramic cooktop for our 'home' home. There's MANY extremely nice gas ranges available these days, and all of them come with everything needed to use either natural gas OR propane...

    And really, most people who enjoy cooking prefer cooking with gas--

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  6. #16
    Senior Member Stmbtwle's Avatar
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    Well it's his boat, his money, and his admiral. One of the things I like about electric is the option of "low". Try that with gas on a boat and there's a good chance the flame will blow out (I've had it happen several times). With the wrong stove, that means BOOM!

    I have an electric range in the house and I prefer it to gas. I have gas on the boat 'cause without a generator, it's the only option. Either one of us can make dinner with either one.
    She's a tired old barge but she's paid for... http://s71.beta.photobucket.com/user...24993.pbw.html

  7. #17
    Senior Member Amelia's Avatar
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    Most of those big production houseboats have home-style kitchens, with plenty of space not boat-ish galleys, right? And they spend most of the time at the dock hooked up to a fat power cable or running big generators. And most are highly air-conditioned. So, I guess we are talking apples and oranges.

    Our shanty boat is more boat than house. The galley, while part of the salon, isn't much bigger than a sailboat's galley. There's no air-conditioning, so a bunch of burners all dumping heat into a small space, especially while heating up and cooling off, not cooking, probably isn't ideal. Three should be plenty for our needs. I cook, and entertain a lot, but on the boat, I expect to keep meals fairly simple, if for no other reason than to minimize prep and clean-up time. Hey, I'm expecting to be on vacation, too.

    Stmbtwle, I have read that many sailors use a 'flame-tamer' diffuser under their pots when they want a low, even simmer. Don't know how well it works, but it's a thought.

  8. #18
    Senior Member Stmbtwle's Avatar
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    Thanks Amelia, I'll have to see if I can find something like you describe. But I agree with you on the big houseboats. They're more vacation homes that just happen to float; and people use 'em that way. "Floating Condo" fits them pretty well. Mine is more of a "floating RV", not really a "house" boat.
    She's a tired old barge but she's paid for... http://s71.beta.photobucket.com/user...24993.pbw.html

  9. #19
    Senior Member easttnboater's Avatar
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    Not all of us use our "big" houseboats as floating condos. Mine is away from the dock 80% of the weekends from May through September. That being said, probably 95% are dock queens.

  10. #20
    Senior Member Endurance's Avatar
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    I"m with East TN. I can't wait to get out and away from the marina and into a secluded cove. Having said that, my full-size gas stove puts a lot of heat in to my galley. I'm on a lake that has high temps around 100 degrees most of the boating season and I don't run the AC that much because if I wanted to sit around in an air conditioned space I'd do it at home instead of going to the lake.

    My strategy for keeping cooking heat out of the cabin is to cook everything I can on the gas barbecue outside. That little side burner that is so useless at home is heaven sent on my houseboat. I use the inside stove for little things like Uncle Ben's wild rice or tapioca pudding, but you can bet that a big pan of spaghetti noodles or a pot with corn on the cob goes outside. A microwave is a bit of a power hog, but can do a lot of good in a short time without pumping much heat into your galley.

    Bottom line is, for a lot of reasons, you want to consider all your cooking options, especially those that don't add heat to the cabin.

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