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Thread: Very First Post: Lots of Questions

  1. #11
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    What Go Vols said

  2. #12
    Senior Member easttnboater's Avatar
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    Gas propulsion and diesel generator - maybe not as great as you think. Typically diesel generators are paired with diesel propulsion. Because of this, in general, diesel generators are not spark protected. So, I would want to make sure that the diesel generator was fully spark protected/enclosed.

    It sounds like the OP is looking for something along the lines of a Hilburn or a small Pluckebaum or maybe a Monticello - a river type houseboat made to cruise and made of aluminum.

  3. #13
    Super Moderator OLD HOUSEBOATER's Avatar
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    There are 2 types of houseboats. Lake Style which may have a mono hull or 2 or more pontoons or hulls and Cruising which has a cruiser hull and lots of power for traveling and operation in more weather. NOTE: not blue water.

    Your probably remembering Gibson, Harbor Master, KingsCraft, Pluckebaum etc. Currently Pluckebaum is still building but the others have gone bye bye.

    With fuel costs being what they are Lake Boats with small engines are the norm. Good used boats are still the best all around deal. If you plan on extensive traveling Diesel is the way to go. All that being said diesel houseboats (other than Pluckebaum) are few and far between.
    The fries are cold so we gave you extra.

  4. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by GoVols View Post
    Someone posted a thread on here several months ago about Gibson reopening. Not sure of the status, but here's their website and phone.
    http://www.gibsonboats.com/default.htm
    (615) 325-9320
    That is there old site. None of the numbers work that are attached to the page. Also, the newest boat they have listed there is a spec sheet for 2012 boats. The main page states they are looking for someone to purchase their business. FYI

  5. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by OLD HOUSEBOATER View Post
    There are 2 types of houseboats. Lake Style which may have a mono hull or 2 or more pontoons or hulls and Cruising which has a cruiser hull and lots of power for traveling and operation in more weather. NOTE: not blue water.

    Your probably remembering Gibson, Harbor Master, KingsCraft, Pluckebaum etc. Currently Pluckebaum is still building but the others have gone bye bye.

    With fuel costs being what they are Lake Boats with small engines are the norm. Good used boats are still the best all around deal. If you plan on extensive traveling Diesel is the way to go. All that being said diesel houseboats (other than Pluckebaum) are few and far between.
    Thank you Old Houseboater! I have found a Gibson diesel and gas that I like. Just nervous about a wood and fiberglass boat. Mainly the wood super structure. My old boat was aluminum, which felt like it was built like a battleship.

  6. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tillerman7 View Post
    Just nervous about a wood and fiberglass boat. Mainly the wood super structure. My old boat was aluminum, which felt like it was built like a battleship.
    You should be. Plywood decks with thin a fiberglass covering. I owned a older Gibson product and over time had to replace every piece of the lower deck. I completely redid the interior and was shocked at how cheaply they were constructed. I went aluminum with a Pluckebaum and would never go back. In addition the aluminum will hold its value unlike the fiberglass. IMO worth the higher initial cost.
    1991 Pluckebaum 70'
    13' Boston Whaler, 40hp Yamaha
    10' AB rib, 25hp Suzuki (for sale)

  7. #17
    Super Moderator OLD HOUSEBOATER's Avatar
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    If your buying a boat for the long term Aluminum is the only way to go. Pluckebaum is the best you can buy. We lived aboard our 55 for 7 years. Best of our lives.
    The fries are cold so we gave you extra.

  8. #18
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    Old Housboater/Boatlover:

    Thank you so much for the information. It's very hard to decipher all the different opinions and facts. So swear by the Gibson others swear it off. Cost like always, is a big concern. If it were possible, I'd love to commission a new Pluckebaum boat, but that isn't in the cards. At this point, I have three boats I am looking at heavily. Two are Gibson (one gas (2005) the other diesel (2006)) and one Pluckebaum houseboat (1995). The Pluckebaum is much older which also makes me nervous about all the hidden gremlins.

    Advice?

  9. #19
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    Just an fyi my old Sumerset is a 77 and I tested the hull 5 years ago with a D meter and the thickness was all with new spec. I don't know about the Pluckebaum, lol could not spell it, but I hear they are great boats. Everyone will recommend a survey before you buy. Most of the big problems from aluminum houseboats seem to come from the roof. If it is not maintained replacing is costly, course this applies to all types of boats.

  10. #20
    Member boatlover's Avatar
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    Tillerman

    I would not be afraid of the 95 Plucke. All used boats can have small issues but if the structure is sound the rest can be addressed. The Plucke is 100% aluminum, there is no roof to replace as it is aluminum also. The only wood is paneling, cabinets and the sub floor. A couple years ago I asked Dennis Pluckebaum " Since you started building boats how many have been damaged beyond repair and scrapped " . The answer was ZERO . They are truly forever boats.
    1991 Pluckebaum 70'
    13' Boston Whaler, 40hp Yamaha
    10' AB rib, 25hp Suzuki (for sale)

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